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They were her property: white women as slave owners in the American South
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More Details
Published:
New Haven : Yale University Press, [2019].
Format:
Book
Physical Desc:
xx, 296 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780300218664, 0300218664, 9780300218664, 0300218664

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 253-273) and index.
Description
"Bridging women's history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery. Historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers draws on a variety of sources to show that slave-owning women were sophisticated economic actors who directly engaged in and benefited from the South's slave market. Because women typically inherited more slaves than land, enslaved people were often their primary source of wealth. Not only did white women often refuse to cede ownership of their slaves to their husbands, they employed management techniques that were as effective and brutal as those used by slave-owning men. White women actively participated in the slave market, profited from it, and used it for economic and social empowerment. By examining the economically entangled lives of enslaved people and slave-owning women, Jones-Rogers presents a narrative that forces us to rethink the economics and social conventions of slaveholding America"--,Provided by publisher.
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Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Jones-Rogers, S. E. (2019). They were her property: white women as slave owners in the American South. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Jones-Rogers, Stephanie E. 2019. They Were Her Property: White Women As Slave Owners in the American South. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Jones-Rogers, Stephanie E, They Were Her Property: White Women As Slave Owners in the American South. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2019.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Jones-Rogers, Stephanie E. They Were Her Property: White Women As Slave Owners in the American South. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2019. Print.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
Staff View
Grouped Work ID:
dec00022-7840-070a-935f-b43f91ced11c
Go To GroupedWork

Record Information

Last File Modification TimeJul 20, 2021 05:45:18 AM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeJul 20, 2021 05:34:13 AM

MARC Record

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1001 |a Jones-Rogers, Stephanie E.|e author.
24510|a They were her property :|b white women as slave owners in the American South /|c Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers.
24630|a White women as slave owners in the American South
264 1|a New Haven :|b Yale University Press,|c [2019]
264 4|c ©2019
300 |a xx, 296 pages :|b illustrations ;|c 24 cm
336 |a text|b txt|2 rdacontent
337 |a unmediated|b n|2 rdamedia
338 |a volume|b nc|2 rdacarrier
504 |a Includes bibliographical references (pages 253-273) and index.
5050 |a Introduction: Mistresses of the Market -- Mistresses in the Making -- "I Belong to de Mistis" -- "Missus Done Her Own Bossing" -- "She Thought She Could Find a Better Market" -- "Wet Nurse for Sale or Hire" -- "That 'Oman Took Delight in Sellin' Slaves" -- "Her Slaves Have Been Liberated and Lost to Her" -- "A Most Unprecedented Robbery" -- Epilogue: Lost Kindred, Lost Cause.
520 |a "Bridging women's history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery. Historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers draws on a variety of sources to show that slave-owning women were sophisticated economic actors who directly engaged in and benefited from the South's slave market. Because women typically inherited more slaves than land, enslaved people were often their primary source of wealth. Not only did white women often refuse to cede ownership of their slaves to their husbands, they employed management techniques that were as effective and brutal as those used by slave-owning men. White women actively participated in the slave market, profited from it, and used it for economic and social empowerment. By examining the economically entangled lives of enslaved people and slave-owning women, Jones-Rogers presents a narrative that forces us to rethink the economics and social conventions of slaveholding America"--|c Provided by publisher.
650 0|a Slaveholders|z Southern States|x History.
650 0|a Slavery|z Southern States|x History|y 18th century.
650 0|a Slavery|z Southern States|x History|y 19th century
651 0|a Southern States|x Social conditions
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